Thursday, April 12, 2018

Korean telecoms companies to share 5G facilities and equipment

The project to build what is widely referred to as 5G (fifth generation) digital networks, more properly called "next generation networks," is attracting a great deal of attention these days, as well it should.   On a global level, this project is undoubtedly the largest engineered infrastructure project in human history.  Accordingly, it is very costly.   Hence the importance of the recent announcement here in Korea that, with government encouragement, the major telecommunications service providers would share the cost of installing 5G facilities and equipment. (see for example, this article in BusinessKorea)   This is an important development and one to watch closely.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Time Magazine piece on Seoul and PyeongChang Olympics -- my interview

As readers of this blog will know, I've long been interested in the political impact of the Olympics as a global media event.  (See my many prior posts)
Some weeks before the opening of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics last month, I was contacted by a writer for Time magazine.  Olivia B. Waxman's article, in which my book (with Heung Soo Park) is cited, was published on February 8 and can be read at this link.  Of course, the story of Olympic diplomacy surrounding the PyeongChang Winter Olympics is still being written, so I anticipate future posts on the topic.

Sunday, March 11, 2018

Robots, simulators help Korea's shipbuilding industry

An interesting article in The Korea Joongang Daily entitled "Robots, simulators help build Korean ships."  One can find the influence of digital technologies (a.k.a. information and communications technologies) in all industries, explaining why we are in the midst of a digital revolution. (click on the graphic for a full size version)

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Korea's beloved Arirang folk song at the PyeongChang Olympics

A very interesting article appeared in The New York Times entitled "A tune heard often at these Olympics gets to the heart of being Korean."   The accompanying video contains a version of the song performed on KBS television.
The New York Times' article includes the following excerpt.  "In an 1896 essay, Homer B. Hulbert, an American missionary in Korea, wrote: “To the average Korean, this one song holds the same place in music that rice does in his food — all else is mere appendage. You hear it everywhere and at all times.” The same could perhaps be said about the song’s place at these Games. It has turned up as more than background music for the skating pair’s routine. It was played twice at Olympic Stadium during the opening ceremony. It has been sung in the stands at hockey games. And with all the interaction here between North and South Korea, it has served as a stand-in national anthem for the formerly unified countries."  The rest of the article is well worth reading.